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About the Indian Education Department

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Programs We Offer

We offer several programs to serve our students:

  • Native American Studies (NAS)
  • Reading Intervention Program
  • Exemplary Cultural Based Education Programs
  • The Indigenous Teaching and Evaluation Model (ITEM)

MISSION

By working together with schools, parents, and communities, APS Indian Education Department will develop enhanced and supportive Indigenous educational opportunities for American Indian/ Alaska Native (AI/AN) students by increasing knowledge of Native values through teaching language and cultural differences.

VISION

American Indian/ Alaska Native students will succeed with appropriate support systems, effective teaching and use of culturally relevant methods and strategies.

 

The Indian Education Department (IED) was established as part of the Albuquerque Public School (APS) district in 1974, with advocacy and representation as the primary purpose for over 123 American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) Tribes enrolled in the school district. There are approximately 6,862 or 5% AI/AN students currently enrolled in APS. The IED strives for academic excellence that aligns with the district goals which include:

  • Increase the graduation rate of AI/AN students by 3% annually
  • Increase the academic achievement of AI/AN students through improved literacy and mathematical skills of students in grades K-12 by 3% as measured by pre and post Reading and Math scores annually
  • Increase the daily attendance rate of AI/AN students through the development of Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) with tribes impacted the most
  • Increase appreciation and expression of cultures, languages, and heritage of AI/AN students’ district-wide.

STATE AND FEDERAL STATUTES

 ELIGIBILITY

Supplemental education services are provided to eligible AI/AN students in grades K-12 through a combination of funding that include: operational, federal (Johnson O’Malley (JOM), Title VI, and Title VII). Eligibility is based on federal requirements (forms 506 and Certificate of Indian Blood (CIB) for each of the federal funds utilized for provision of services to the AI/AN students.

 (1) Title VI: Form 506 is required by U.S. Department of Education and must be completely filled out by the student’s parent/guardian. The form may be obtained at the school, IED, and/or the website: http://www.aps.edu/indian-education/ Submit the form to your child’s school or to the Indian Education Department.

 (2) Johnson O’Malley (JOM): Certificate of Indian Blood (CIB) is required by the U.S. Department of the Interior. The CIBs are processed and certified by each tribal office to which the student and family belong. A second new category is now compiled of “potential” students who meet blood quantum and federally recognized by the federal government. A CIB letter may be obtained at the school, IED, and/or the website: http://www.aps.edu/indian-education/

 (3) Impact Aid (Title VII): Students who reside on federal lands in 11 Native communities within a 50-mile radius from Albuquerque are verified on the Source Check by the tribal official of each community. Please report your child’s correct residence address.  https://www.aps.edu/indian-education/impact-aid

 WHO WE ARE

(9) Resource Teachers, highly qualifiedwith New Mexico certification teach in elementary (6), middle (1), and high schools (2). The teachers provide supplemental instruction using scientifically-researched Reading and Math Intervention Programs integrated with culturally relevant teaching methods and materials. Methods include use of multisensory and differentiated instruction interfaced with Indigenous evaluation and assessments used to empower and strengthen AI/AN student’s self esteem and academic skills. Some programs used include: Star Reading, Star Early Literacy, Star Math (Math assessment), and Indigenous Instructional Unit Plans aligned to the Common Core standards for grades K-8. The middle school and high school’s courses include; Native American Studies 1 and 2, Leadership, Navajo Government and History, Native American History and Government.

 (5) Native Language Teachers (3 Navajo and 2 Zuni Language) One Navajo language teacher and one Zuni language teacher serve all high schools at the Career Enrichment Center and Early College Academy (CEC/ECA) serving as the hub for most students. During a regular school year, High school students are bussed to CEC/ECA from their respective high schools daily and serves as a hub for most students. CEC/ECA assists students with coordination for registration and grades. One high school serves students onsite at Del Norte High School. The full time language teachers provide Navajo Language instruction utilizing the NMPED approved (Yazzie & Speas, 2007) Dine’ Bizaad Binahoo’aah textbook and curriculum. The Native Language teachers hold NM 520 licensures. There is also dual credit available through the Institute for American Indian Art (IAIA) for Native languages (Navajo and Zuni). A three-year grant award; Diné Bizaad & A:shiwi Language Program from the U.S. Department of Education in the amount of $249,438.00 per year funds three additional Native Language teachers (two Navajo and one Zuni) in SY2018-2021 at nine schools. The following schools will receive services as follows; Navajo language: Jimmy Carter MS, Chaparral ES, McKinley MS, and Cleveland MS. Zuni language will be offered as follows; Hodgin ES, Wilson MS, Chelwood ES, Janet Kahn ES, and Seven Bar ES.

 (1) Certified College and Career Counselor (CCRC) to support students in grades 9-12 with an emphasis on grades transition from 12th grade to college and vocational institutions. The CCRC coordinates services for activities that include; College Connection Days (fall and spring), College visits (Ft. Lewis, UNM, and CNM), Financial aid nights, workshops with college planners and scholarship representatives. AI/AN students are supported by the CCRS for; grades, attendance, high school course credits, referrals, and coordination of appropriate services. The counselor will also support AI/AN students in elementary and middle schools as needed.

(3) Home to School Community Liaisons (HSCL) Three staff will support K-12 educational services to AI/AN students and families in 99 Title one schools in four zones from elementary, middle, and high school levels as well as schools of choice. One liaison will serve zone one with 32 schools; a second liaison will serve 33 schools in zone 2, and the third liaison will serve a total of (34 schools) in zones 3 and four. The liaisons will support families and students with home visits, direct communication and support the respective schools with messages between schools and families. The support services to be provided include serving as a conduit to removing learning barriers by extending a hand and a welcoming voice in an otherwise a busy environment. The liaisons will help connect the families to appropriate district services for students who may have needs but lacks the skills to navigate for educational services for their child or self.

 The focus areas to be impacted by the HSCL include;

  • Support to professional staff; nurses, counselors, social workers, teachers, and principals
  • Increase truancy intervention efforts through expanding information to families about availability of school-based health centers and sources of support. Being a member of the community makes the liaisons much aware of the AI/AN children and easier to build trust with students and families.
  • Creating and sharing awareness of behavior expert support to serve the students by each of the professionals in the schools.

 Tribal Officials, Committees, and other Support membership consists of parents, leaders, and experts from tribal communities; pueblos, Tohajiilee and Albuquerque. Their role is to advise and support educationally related programs and services to families and students per the Indian Policies and Procedures (IPP). The meetings areconducted in the schoolsand native communities throughout the school year andare open to the public. Indian Parent Committee, Indian Education Committee and the Indian Education Stakeholders Committeewas formed in spring 2019 after two Native American Community Forums. The stakeholders committee was established to address concerns expressed by the Native American community in four key areas; Professional Development, Curriculum, School Climate and Language and Culture. The committee members are comprised of community and tribal leaders, researchers, educators, high school students and parents. All committees meet monthly to develop an organized and systemic education plan to support the Native American students attending district schools.

 The Indian Education Committee (IEC) and the Indian Parent Committee (IPC) members consisting of seven members (5 parents, one counselor (vacant), and one high school student represent the AI/AN community. The membership comprised of parents from several tribal entities and communities including; Tohajiilee, Pueblo of Zuni and Albuquerque. The IEC and the IPC meet monthly at specified locations and communities including pueblos and Tohajiilee/Canoncito. Their role is to advise and support educationally related programs and services to families and students. The meetings arehosted by many schools and native communities throughout the school year andare open to the public. The annual meeting dates and locations are developed each year and begin at 5:30pm.

 Indian Education Stakeholders Committee was formed in spring 2019 after two Native American Community Forums. The stakeholders committee was established to address concerns expressed by the Native American community in four key areas; Professional Development, Curriculum, School Climate and Language and Culture. The committee members are comprised of community and tribal leaders, researchers, educators, high school students and parents. Monthly planning meetings are conducted to develop an organized and systemic education plan to support the Native American students attending district schools.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Merging Pathways

This is a professional development and research collaboration between the APS Indian Education Department and WIDA.  Merging Pathways project seeks to define and co-construct culturally-specific practices that merge native and non-native ways of teaching and learning, recognizing the duality of these perspectives.  Teachers will learn to deconstruct literacy practices that assume linguistic and cultural knowledge on the part of students and co-construct explicit teaching and learning practices that make academic language visible.  Teachers will engage in direct professional development at least two hours per month on “skinny Mondays” and in guided and independent practice throughout the school day.

 

ADDITIONAL PROGRAMS AND SERVICES

Student field trips – academic & cultural

Transition programs (middle and high schools)

Back-to-school supplies, K-12 (fall)

Honor roll recognition for students (GPA 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0)

Cap and gown for graduating seniors

Virtual College Connection Day for high school students (fall & spring)

Student leadership development

Stoles and seals for bilingual coursework and community volunteer work

Annual Spring Fashion Show

Annual Winter Stories

Susie Rayos Marmon Elementary Spring Pow Wow (Tentative)

 

PARTNERS

Indian Education Department is in partnership with external organizations to supplement services and activities:

  • American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES)
  • First Nations Health Source
  • Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA)
  • Isleta Pueblo Education Department
  • Jobs for Americas Graduates (JAGS)
  • Junior Achievement Native American Initiative
  • Molina Healthcare
  • National Indian Youth Council
  • City of Albuquerque
  • New Mexico Community College Concurrent Enrollment
  • New Mexico Education Department (Indian Education Department)
  • Petroglyph National Park
  • Pueblo of Zuni Tribal Council
  • Sandia National Laboratories (Native American Outreach Committee)
  • Santa Ana Tribal Education Department
  • Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute (SIPI)
  • Tohajiilee Community Chapter and Court
  • University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center: Center for Native American Heath (CNAH)
  • University of New Mexico American Indian Studies
  • Urban Indian Center