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News from 2019-2020

Posted: June 8, 2020

Addressing Equity and Race Relations

A list of resources from the APS Office of Equity and Engagement and school districts across the nation. Plus, statements from APS Leadership and the Board of Education on the tragic death of George Floyd.

For Parents 

How to Talk to Kids about Race and Racism - Parent Toolkit from NBC News Learn

Talking About Race - National Museum of African American History and Culture

How to talk with your kids about racism, from ParentToolkit.com

What Do We Tell Our Children: USA Today 

8 tips for choosing ‘good’ picture books featuring Black and Indigenous people and People of Color 

Having 'The Talk': Expert Guidance On Preparing Kids For Police Interactions -- WBEZ Chicago

How to Talk to Your Kids About Protests and Racism -- CNN


For Educators

From Chalkbeat: Moments like now are why we teach:  Educators tackle tough conversations about race and violence --this time virtually 

New York Times' Lesson of the Day: "I Can’t Breathe”: 4 Minneapolis Officers Fired After Black Man Dies in Custody

The “Equity Case Analysis Process” provides a step by step process for a structured discussion that analyzes a situation and leads to a brainstorming session on immediate and long term action.

“Exploring Solutions to Address Racial Disparity Concerns” is a high school lesson from the Anti-Defamation League. It was written after the Michael Brown incident, but it is still very relevant -- the questions in step 2 are particularly relevant and guiding.

From the Share My Lesson website organized by the American Federation of Teachers, a timely lesson on the death of George Floyd and the subsequent protests across the country. 

From the educational reporting site Chalkbeat, authors Reema Amin, Caroline Bauman, and Stephanie Wang explain how educators across the country are addressing conversations about race and violence during this time. 

From National Public Radio (NPR), you’ll find a message from President Obama that includes a powerful song by Keedron Bryant about his feelings during this time of unrest.  

From Brightly, a link to the article on how to talk to kids about race with suggestions of books that can assist in your discussions with students. 

From the Anti-Defamation League, this lesson on race and racism is designed for elementary and middle school students. 

2020 Curriculum Resource Guide - Black Lives Matter At School

Teaching About Race and Racism and Social Justice Issues - AFT Share My Lesson

Race and Equity Resources from the American School Counselor Association  

Racial Equity Resource Guide - W.K. Kellogg Foundation


Resources from Other Public School Systems 

​Addressing Racialized Violence with Our Students - San Diego (Calif.) County Office of Education

An Educators Guide to This Moment: Resources for Educators, Parents and Students - Montgomery County (Md.) Public Schools

Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Resources - Jeffco Public Schools, Golden, Colo.

Guidance on How Districts Can Facilitate Conversations About Race-based Stress and Trauma - Kentucky Department of Education

Resources for Parents and Students Regarding Racism - The School District of Palm Beach County, West Palm Beach, Fla.

Resources on Community Unrest, Justice and Support (English, Spanish) - Los Angeles Unified School District

Say Their Names: A toolkit to help foster productive conversations about race and civil disobedience - Chicago (Ill.) Public Schools

Talking to Children and Youth About Race and Racism - Adams 12 Five Star Schools, Thornton, Colo. 


Statement from APS Leadership on the Tragic Death of George Floyd

The senseless killing of George Floyd cannot be explained, accepted, or ignored.

This isn’t a time to throw our hands up and dismiss what’s happening all around us. This case of police brutality took place in Minneapolis, but it’s not the first, and sadly, will not be the last. Before anything can change, we have to ask ourselves what we are willing to do as individuals to help our communities heal and advance.

Historically, we’ve always been willing to defend our  American values. Our courage to stand up to anything that threatens our ideals, our way of life, and personal safety is what makes us a great nation. Yet, relentless acts of racism and inequities that touch us all never cease.

Public education plays an important part in promoting equity, dignity, and respect. As educators, we strive to create safe and welcoming environments for all students and staff to come together to learn and thrive. But our students are not just our students, they are citizens of the world, and they see and hear for themselves the ugly realities we face. Perhaps more importantly, they learn by example.

No one should ever fear for their life because of their skin color, religion, sexual orientation, or disability. But, the tragedies we’ve seen play out tell us the fear is real.

We have to be engaged to right these wrongs. We encourage you to stay informed, ask questions when necessary, and expect more from one another.

Racism isn’t a problem for any single government agency, community group, or think-tank to solve. The responsibility to end racism belongs to each of us.

Please talk to your children, your friends, and your family about  George Floyd’s death. If your children are too young to discuss hatred, violence, and ignorance, start with conversations about the importance of empathy, acceptance, and kindness in our world.

Our country’s response to George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis is complicated, troubling, and ongoing.  Some say what we allow continues. We cannot ignore the images and pleas coming into our homes via audio and video clips on our phones, TVs, and tablets. Please, add your voice to those who say enough.


Statement from APS Board of Education on the Tragic Death of George Floyd

he APS Board of Education releases this statement in solidarity with the statements made by the Council of the Great City Schools (CGCS), National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials (NALEO), our own APS District as well as many other organizations on the recent uprisings and protests happening across the nation in the wake of the death of George Floyd.

We are deeply concerned and distressed about the indefensible murders of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery,  Breonna Taylor, Michael Brown, Sandra Bland, Eric Garner, Trayvon Martin, Sean Reed, and so many other Black lives. All who have been victims of injustice.

We recognize the wounds of institutional and systemic racism in the United States, including New Mexico, and understand the common denominator of hatred behind those injustices as they seek to besiege and silence those they oppress. We stand in solidarity in support of basic human dignity and against institutional and systemic racism, violence, and discrimination of any kind. We raise our voices in unity with calls for equity, fairness, and equal protection under the law.  This is a moment of reckoning for our communities, and we must call for change and advocate for social justice.

Public education plays an important part in promoting equity, dignity, and respect. As educators, we strive to create safe and welcoming environments for all students and staff to come together to learn and thrive. But our students are not just our students, they are citizens of the world, and they see and hear for themselves the ugly realities we face. Perhaps more importantly, they learn by example. No one should ever fear for their life because of their race, skin color, religion, sexual orientation, gender, or disability. But, the tragedies we’ve seen play out tell us the fear is real.

We commit to rise, as one of the leaders of our nation’s urban public schools, by amplifying our efforts. We commit to ensure that our schools are safe havens where all children are respected and nurtured, where all children can achieve and grow, and where all children are guaranteed equity and justice.