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You are here: APS Home News KANW to Air “Code Talker” on The Radio Reader

KANW to Air “Code Talker” on The Radio Reader

Public radio program featuring book written by the last surviving code talker Chester Nez beginning June 14.

June 13, 2013

Albuquerque Public Schools’ KANW radio station (89.1 FM) will air a reading of “Code Talker,” the featured book on The Radio Reader program, beginning at 8:30 a.m. Friday, June 14. The book was written by Chester Nez, the last surviving member of the World War II code talkers, with Judith Schiess Avila.

The Radio Reader is a National Public Radio program hosted by veteran announcer Dick Estell, which airs at 8:30 a.m. weekdays on KANW, as well as KNLK  in Santa Rosa (91.9 FM) and KIDS in Grants (88.1 FM). Estell reads about a dozen books in their entirety each year on the nationally syndicated program.

“Code Talker” was published by Berkeley Caliber N.Y. in 2011 and will air June 14 through July 10. Nez was at the KANW studios in 2011 for a national interview program on NPR.

Nez is the last surviving member of the original 29 code talkers, a group of Navajo men who served in the U.S. Marines during World War II. They developed a code that no enemy was able to crack, when the Japanese had been able to break every other code the United States came up with. According to the book, the Navajo code remains the only unbroken code in the history of modern warfare.

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