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You are here: APS Home News APS eCADEMY to Open its First Building

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APS eCADEMY to Open its First Building

Former Evening HS has shared space for 98 years

APS eCADEMY to Open its First Building

APS Chief Information Officer Tom Ryan (second from left) and members of Innovate-Educate chat in a hallway following the ribbon-cutting ceremony for eCADEMY.

April 27, 2011

Albuquerque Public Schools eCADEMY will celebrate the opening of the first building in its 98-year history at a ribbon-cutting ceremony at noon, Friday, April 29, at the school, 5301 Euclid NE. As the former Evening High School moves into its new age of online and face-to-face learning, representatives from Intel Corp. and Innovate-Education will join in the celebration in the media center.

“Evening High has been a significant part of APS for nearly a century,” APS Superintendent Winston Brooks said. “It’s only fitting that a new name and academic opportunities bring a new learning environment for its students.”

The two oldest high schools in the city, Evening High began as an extension of Albuquerque High School in 1913 and shared space within AHS until earlier this year. It became an independent school with its own faculty and administration in 1977.

In its early days, the school provided an opportunity for adults in the community to return to high school for classes needed for their jobs. Eventually, it attracted Korean and Vietnam War veterans who were able to complete their high school education. The new eCADEMY serves about 1,500 non-traditional students, most of whom take classes part-time while working. Many support families. According to the school, the average age of its students is 21.

“Albuquerque Evening High School helped thousands of students earn a diploma over the last 98 years, but it never had a building to call its own. Now we are known as eCADEMY, and we are excited to have a 21st century online curriculum and a state-of-the-art facility to help students meet the challenges of the next 100 years,” Principal Dave Wells said. “We really appreciate the vision and support we've received from the district and the greater Albuquerque community.”

The new building is located next to Freedom and New Futures high schools on Cutler NE, off San Mateo and I-40, but faces Euclid.

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