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About the Indian Education Department

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Programs We Offer

We offer several programs to serve our students:

  • Native American Studies (NAS)
  • Reading Intervention Program
  • Exemplary Cultural Based Education Programs
  • The Indigenous Teaching and Evaluation Model (ITEM)

Mission

By working together with schools, parents and communities, APS Indian Education Department will develop enhanced and supportive Indigenous educational opportunities for all Native American students by increasing knowledge of Native values through teaching language and cultural differences.

Vision

All American Indian/ Alaska Native students will succeed with appropriate support systems, effective teaching, and use of culturally relevant methods and strategies.

Who We Are

The Indian Education Department (IED) was established as part of the Albuquerque Public School district in 1974, with the primary purpose for advocacy and representation for the 117 different American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) Tribes enrolled in the school district. There are approximately 5,700 or 5.1% AI/AN students currently enrolled in APS. The IED strives for academic excellence that aligns with the district goals including:

  1. Increase the graduation rate of American Indian/ Alaska Native students by 3% each year.
  2. Increase the academic achievement of American Indian/ Alaska Native students through improved literacy and mathematical skills of AI/AN students in grades K-12 by 3% as measured by pre and post Reading and Math scores by the end of SY 2011-2012.
  3. Increase the daily attendance rate of American Indian/ Alaska Native students through the development of MOAs with greatest impacted tribes.
  4. Increase appreciation and expression of cultures, languages, and heritage of American Indian/ Alaska Native students district-wide.

Supplemental education services are provided to eligible AI/AN students in grades K-12 through a combination of funding including:  operational, federal (Johnson O’Malley, Title VII, and Title VIII). Eligibility is based on federal requirements for each of the federal funds utilized for provision of services to the American Indian/ Alaska Native students.

What We Do

17 Resource Teachers with New Mexico highly qualified certification teach in 10 elementary, three middle and 3 high schools.  In addition, there is one teacher mentor that provides support to all 16 teachers.  The teachers provide supplemental instruction using scientifically-researched Reading and Math Intervention Programs integrated with culturally relevant teaching methods and materials. Methods include use of multisensory and differentiated instructions interfaced with indigenous evaluation and assessments and are used to empower and strengthen American Indian/ Asaska Native student’s self esteem and academic skills.

3 Navajo Language Teachers are assigned to Highland High School, West Mesa High School, Del Norte High School, Cibola High School, and the Career Enrichment Center support students with courses in Navajo Language 1, 2 & 3.  The full time teachers provide Navajo Language instruction utilizing the NMPED approved (Yazzie & Speas, 2007) Dine Bizaad Binahoo aah textbook and curriculum.  All Navajo language teachers hold NM level I or II teacher licensures.

13 Exemplary After School Programs known as the Ohiyesa programs are offered in 14 schools. The program emphasis is to increase American Indian/ Alaska Native knowledge and skills integrating science and mathematical concepts that include astronomy, philosophy, plants, ecology, medicine, geology and thinking the higher thoughts. 

The Indian Education Committee (IEC) and the Indian Parent Committee (IPC) members consisting of nine parents, one counselor, and two students (high school and middle school) represent the AI/AN community. The membership comprises of parents from several tribal entities and communities including Isleta, Acoma, Jemez, Kewa, Laguna, Zuni, Tohajiilee, and Albuquerque. The IEC and the IPC meet monthly at specified locations including pueblos and Tohajiilee community.  their role is to advise and support educationally related programs and services to families and students. The meetings are hosted by many schools and native communities throughout the school year and are open to the public.

Who We Serve

Student eligibility is determined by submitting two forms:

  1. Form 506 is required by Title VII with the U.S. Department of Education.
  2. Certificate of Indian Blood (CIB) is required by the Johnson O’Malley Program with the U.S. Department of the Interior. The CIB’s are certified by your tribal office.

Both forms may be obtained at the school, in person from the Indian Education Department, or from the forms section on the Parents page. Submit both forms to your child’s school or to the Indian Education Department.

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Indian Education News
Fall 2016 Dual Credit Courses offered by Institute of American Indian Arts
APS and the Indian Education Department is partnering with IAIA to provide Native Language Courses to Junior and Seniors.
BACK-TO-SCHOOL SUPPLIES 2016-2017
When: July 18, 2016 for the following schools: Cochiti ES, Duranes ES, Eugene Field ES, Mary Ann Binford ES, Mark Twain ES, Onate ES, and Susie Rayos Marmon ES. August 8-19, 2016 for Regular APS Schools. Who: Students currently enrolled in Albuquerque Public Schools, Students in grades K-12, and Students with completed 506 forms and CIB. Where: Indian Education Department 6400 Uptown Blvd. NE Suite 460w, Albuquerque, NM. Contact: Elizabeth Trujillo at telephone number (505) 884-6392 and/or email at Trujillo_eli@aps.edu
IED Gradpoint Credit Recovery June 2016
APS Indian Education Department’s GradPoint Credit Recovery Summer Program will be held in June 2016.